Jodi Magness, Ph.D.

Specializing in the archaeology of Palestine/Ancient Israel and the surrounding areas in the Roman and Byzantine Periods, chronologically from about the time of Jesus up to the Muslim conquest of Palestine in the Seventh Century.

Jodi Magness
University of North Carolina
Latest Book
Biblical Archaeology of the Holy Land

Jodi Magness holds a senior endowed chair in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: the Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism (since 2002).

She is an archaeologist and the First Vice-President of the Archaeological Institute of America. She has published 10 books, including The Archaeology of the Holy Land, and dozens of articles.

From 1992-2002, Professor Magness was Associate/Assistant Professor of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology in the Departments of Classics and Art History at Tufts University, Medford, MA.

Professor Magness received her B.A. in Archaeology and History from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1977), and her Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from the University of Pennsylvania (1989).

From 1990–92, Professor Magness was Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow in Syro-Palestinian Archaeology at the Center for Old World Archaeology and Art at Brown University.

Professor Magness specializes in the archaeology of ancient Palestine (modern Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinian territories) in the Roman, Byzantine, and early Islamic periods. Her research interests include Jerusalem, Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient synagogues, Masada, the Roman army in the East, and ancient pottery.

Click here for more than 90,000 references to Jodi Magness.

Elephants may not be in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament), but they first appear in the Huqoq Synagogue unique mosaic floors.

The Huqoq Excavation Project is committed to providing education and research opportunities
to graduate students training to become the next generation of archaeologists.
This link explains the details.

The Huqoq Excavation Project is committed to providing education and research opportunities to graduate students training to become the next generation of archaeologists. These students serve as assistant supervisors in the field and on-site specialists in processing the finds. The fieldwork experience is critical to their professional development as well as to the success of the project.

Grant funding for archaeological projects is extremely limited and generally supports only field work and conservation. Due to the shrinking resources of public universities, it is a struggle to find funds to subsidize the travel expenses of our graduate students who live on tight budgets. With your help, we seek to raise funds to cover the cost of airfare for 3 graduate students. Any monies raised beyond $5,000 will be used to cover the cost of airfare for additional graduate students.

 

(Note about spelling variations. Our style is to use the transliteration of the village name as "Huqoq."
Other versions found in different bible and concordance publications include:
Huqooq, Hukok, Hukkok, Yakuk, Yaquq, Chuqoq, Chuqqoq.)